CPSC: Past July 4th Drownings Serve as a Warning this Independence Day

Chairman urges parents, children to enjoy the pool but ‘Pool Safely’ over holiday WASHINGTON, D.C. – As the Independence Day holiday approaches and families enjoy time together in pools across the country, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is sharing some sobering statistics on the number of drownings during previous July 4th holidays. CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum is reminding parents and caregivers to pool safely during upcoming pool parties and celebrations with family and friends. “Along with fireworks, spending time in the pool is a traditional July 4th activity for many families,” Chairman Tenenbaum said. “Child drownings are a preventable tragedy, so we encourage all families who are planning to spend time in pools and spas over the Independence Day holiday and all summer to adopt as many safety steps as possible. You never know which safety step will save a life—until it does.” According to analysis of media reports by USA Swimming, the national governing body for the sport of swimming, in 2011, there were 25 drowning incidents involving children younger than 15 reported over the week of the July 4 holiday (June 30 through July 6). In 2010, 24 drowning incidents were reported during that same week. CPSC reports that annually there are about 390 pool or spa-related drownings for children younger than 15. Another 5,200 children of that age go to hospital emergency rooms for near-drowning injuries. An unknown number of children are seriously brain-damaged. CPSC’s Pool Safely campaign (www.PoolSafely.gov) is a national public education effort to reduce child drownings, near-drownings and entrapments in swimming pools and spas. The campaign’s message is that Simple Steps Save Lives. Simple water steps that could help families avoid a tragedy this holiday include: Staying […]

One Child Dies Every Three Weeks from a TV Tipping Over

New Report Reveals a 31% Increase in Injuries from Television Tip-Overs in the Last 10 Years Washington, DC – A new report released today by Safe Kids Worldwide and SANUS revealed that every three weeks, a child dies from a television tipping over and nearly 13,000 more children are injured each year in the U.S. This represents a 31 percent increase in TV tip-over-related injuries over the last ten years. The study, A Report to the Nation on Home Safety: The Dangers of TV Tip-Overs, includes data from the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and new findings from Safe Kids Worldwide primary research. According to the CPSC, from 2000-2010, on average, a child dies every three weeks. The report shows that young children are at greatest risk of TV tip-overs. According to the research, 7 out of 10 children injured by TV tip-overs are 5 years old or younger. This age group also accounts for 9 out of 10 serious injuries requiring hospitalization, including head injuries, which are among the most severe. “Every 45 minutes, or less than the length of a Sesame Street episode, a child visits the ER because of a TV tipping over,” said Kate Carr, President and CEO of Safe Kids Worldwide. “Dramas and tragedies should be on TV, not caused by them.” Many TV tip-overs are a result of unsteady TVs that are not secured to the wall. Flat screen TVs that are top-heavy with narrow bases can be easily pulled off an entertainment center or table. Large and heavy old-style cathode ray tube (CRT) TVs placed on dressers or high furniture can also tip over if children climb the drawers to reach a remote control, a piece of candy, […]

Carbon Monoxide (CO) Sensor – Safety Tips

The Hard Facts Carbon monoxide (CO) is a gas that you cannot see, taste or smell. Each year, 184 children in the United States die due to carbon monoxide poisoning and more than 20,000 children visit the emergency room. The danger of carbon monoxide is increased in the winter or during hurricane season because fuel-powered devices are used more frequently. Top Tips Make sure your home has a carbon monoxide alarm. As with smoke alarms, install a carbon monoxide alarm on every level of your home, especially near sleeping areas, and keep them at least 15 feet away from fuel-burning appliances. Carbon monoxide alarms are not substitutes for smoke alarms, and vice versa. Combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are available. Don’t use a grill, generator or camping stove inside your home, garage or near a window. If you need to warm a vehicle, remove it from the garage immediately after starting it. Don’t leave a car, SUV or motorcycle engine running inside a garage. If using gasoline-powered devices, store gasoline in a locked location where children cannot access it. Keep only small quantities in an approved container that has child safety features. Keep gasoline away from any source of heat, spark or flame. Even common household appliances such as water heaters and clothes dryers can start a gasoline fire. Be sure to store your gasoline away from anything that could ignite it. More info on CO Sensors.  

Evo Stroller Recall – Baby Strangulation and Entrapment Hazard!

Please check out the recent Recalls on wemakeitsafer.com! EVO has recalled almost 300 units of stroller due to strangulation and entrapment hazard! Remember to check recall lists often to insure you dont have any products in your home that could be harmful to your family! Evo Stroller Recall

New Study Suggests Ski and Snowboard Helmets Should be Required

Please check out We Make It Safer.com for great safety tips! Winter Storms are still bringing us snow here in Southern California as well as all around the country. Lets make sure your family is safe during these winter activities! http://wemakeitsafer.com/

Dream On Me Recalls Children’s Bed Rails Due to Suffocation and Strangulation Hazards

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product. Name of Product: Dream On Me Bed Rails Units: About 900 Importer: Dream On Me Inc., of South Plainfield, N.J. Hazard: The bed rail can separate from the mattress allowing a child’s body to become entrapped if it slips between the rail and the mattress. This poses suffocation and strangulation hazards to children. Incidents/Injuries: None reported. Description: This recall involves Dream On Me Bed Rails. The bed rails are used to keep young children from falling out of bed. They have a white metal frame covered by blue or pink mesh fabric and metal arms that extend about 11/2 feet under the mattress. The bed rails measure 17 inches high x 41 inches long. “Dream on Me” is printed on the top rail. Sold at: Small independent stores and online at amazon.com and wayfair.com from September 2011 through May 2012 for between $15 and $30. Manufactured in: China Remedy: Consumers should stop using the bed rails immediately and contact Dream On Me for a refund. Consumer Contact: Dream On Me; toll-free at (877) 201-4317 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday.  

By |December 8th, 2012|Recalls|0 Comments

Safety 1st Cabinet Locks Recalled Due to Lock Failure; Children Can Gain Unintended Access to Dangerous Items

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product. Name of product: Push ‘N Snap Cabinet Locks Units: About 900,000 Importer: Dorel Juvenile Group (DJG) Inc., of Columbus, Ind. Hazard: Young children can disengage the cabinet locks, allowing access to cabinet contents and posing the risk of injury, due to dangerous or unsafe items. Incidents/Injuries: DJG has received 200 reports of locks that did not adequately secure the cabinet, including reports of damaged locks. Of the reported incidents, the firm is aware of 140 children between the ages of 9 months and 5 years who were able to disengage the locks and gain access to the cabinet’s contents. In three of the reported incidents, the children who gained access swallowed or handled dishwashing detergent, window cleaner or oven cleaner, and were treated, observed and released from emergency treatment centers. Description: This recall involves Safety 1st Push ‘N Snap cabinet locks with model numbers 48391 and 48442. The model numbers are printed on the back of the product and on packaging. The locks are used to secure cabinets with two straps that wrap around the knobs or handles on a cabinet door. When the product is in the “lock” position, a green triangle is shown through a window on the device. The Safety 1st logo is embossed on the front of the lock. Locks manufactured between January 2004 and November 2010 are included in the recall. The date of manufacture is embossed on the back. The […]

Call Now Button